How functionalist view social policies in the society

Social Policies Social policies in the UK In the UK there are many social policies that include being able to marry only on person at a time, only someone of the opposite sex however civil partnership now exist. Social policies that affect divorce include whether or not divorce is legal, the amount of time you have to stay married before divorce is possible and who gains custody of the children. This affects children by having to go to school between the ages of 5 and 16, not being able to work part time until they are 13 and full time until they are A whole range laws to do with smoking, drinking, sexual behaviour and even going to the cinema.

How functionalist view social policies in the society

Law of three stages Auguste Comtethe "Father of Positivism ", pointed out the need to keep society unified as many traditions were diminishing. He was the first person to coin the term sociology. Comte suggests that sociology is the product of a three-stage development: From the beginning of human history until the end of the European Middle Agespeople took a religious view that society expressed God's will.

People began seeing society as a natural system as opposed to the supernatural. This began with enlightenment and the ideas of HobbesLockeand Rousseau.

How functionalist view social policies in the society

Perceptions of society reflected the failings of a selfish human nature rather than the perfection of God. Describing society through the application of the scientific approachwhich draws on the work of scientists. He was in many ways the first true sociological functionalist.

Just as the structural parts of the human body — the skeleton, muscles, and various internal organs — function independently to help the entire organism survive, social structures work together to preserve society. Cultural anthropology also consistently uses functionalism. This evolutionary modelunlike most 19th century evolutionary theories, is cyclical, beginning with the differentiation and increasing complication of an organic or "super-organic" Spencer's term for a social system body, followed by a fluctuating state of equilibrium and disequilibrium or a state of adjustment and adaptationand, finally, the stage of disintegration or dissolution.

Following Thomas Malthus ' population principles, Spencer concluded that society is constantly facing selection pressure s internal and external that force it to adapt its internal structure through differentiation. Every solution, however, causes a new set of selection pressures that threaten society's viability.

It should be noted that Spencer was not a determinist in the sense that he never said that Selection pressures will be felt in time to change them; They will be felt and reacted to; or The solutions will always work.

In fact, he was in many ways a political sociologist[12] and recognized that the degree of centralized and consolidated authority in a given polity could make or break its ability to adapt.

In other words, he saw a general trend towards the centralization of power as leading to stagnation and ultimately, pressures to decentralize.

Functionalist View – Hectic Teacher's A Level Sociology Site

More specifically, Spencer recognized three functional needs or prerequisites that produce selection pressures: He argued that all societies need to solve problems of control and coordination, production of goods, services and ideasand, finally, to find ways of distributing these resources.

Initially, in tribal societies, these three needs are inseparable, and the kinship system is the dominant structure that satisfies them.

As many scholars have noted, all institutions are subsumed under kinship organization, [13] [14] but, with increasing population both in terms of sheer numbers and densityproblems emerge with regard to feeding individuals, creating new forms of organization—consider the emergent division of labour—coordinating and controlling various differentiated social units, and developing systems of resource distribution.

The solution, as Spencer sees it, is to differentiate structures to fulfill more specialized functions; thus a chief or "big man" emerges, soon followed by a group of lieutenants, and later kings and administrators.

The structural parts of society e. Therefore, social structures work together to preserve society.Published: Mon, 5 Dec Public health, the new ideology may be taken to mean the promotion of healthy lifestyles linked to behaviour and individual responsibility supported by government action; whereas traditionally the description tended to relate more to sanitary reform and ‘healthy conditions’.

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Oct 14,  · Social policies in the UK Functionalist Views on social policy Functionalists have generally taken a positive view on social policy. The welfare state takes a lot of pressure off the family with regard to education and health care, and allows the family to .

COLLEGE OF ARTS & SCIENCES ANTHROPOLOGY Detailed course offerings (Time Schedule) are available for. Autumn Quarter ; ANTH Introduction to Anthropology (5) I&S Introduction to the subfields of archaeology, biocultural anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology through the examination of selected problems in human physical, cultural, and social .

Social Deviance - Social deviance is a very broad term, which describes actions or behaviors that violate social “norms.” Norms, in a simple context, are rules by which members of society are expected to conform to. The Functionalist Perspective on Deviance.

Describe the functionalist view of deviance in society. Key Takeaways Key Points. A structural functionalist approach emphasizes social solidarity, divided into organic and mechanical typologies, and stability in social structures.

Functionalist - social policies - Mindmap in A Level and IB Sociology