Explain the types of support and information carers may require

This information gives a ten step guide to challenging a benefit decision. For information on challenging any other benefit decisions contact the Carers UK Adviceline. Ten step guide to challenging a benefit decision Carers UK has put together a ten step guide to challenging a benefit decision. You can read through the steps in order, or click on any of the steps to the right to be taken directly to that information.

Explain the types of support and information carers may require

To meet the challenges of the future, it will be vital that the care and support system intervenes early to support individuals, helps people retain or regain their skills and confidence, and prevents need or delays deterioration wherever possible.

This guidance sets out how local authorities should go about fulfilling their responsibilities, both individually and in partnership with other local organisations, communities, and people themselves. In considering how to give effect to their responsibilities, local authorities should consider the range of options available, and how those different approaches could support the needs of their local communities.

The use of such terms is aimed to illustrate what type of services, facilities and resources could be considered, arranged and provided as part of a prevention service, as well as to whom and when such services could be provided or arranged.

However, services can cut across any or all of these 3 general approaches and as such the examples provided under each approach are not to be seen as limited to that particular approach.

Prevention should be seen as an ongoing consideration and not a single activity or intervention. These are services, facilities or resources provided or arranged that may help an individual avoid developing needs for care and support, or help a carer avoid developing support needs by maintaining independence and good health and promoting wellbeing.

They are generally universal for example, available to all services, which may include, but are not limited to interventions and advice that: The main aim is to bring those people that feel socially isolated and lonely into their local communities. In an evaluation of a new hub there was significant improvement on a friendship scale with scores moving from people feeling isolated or with a low level of social support at the beginning of the hub to very or highly socially connected at follow up.

I look forward to Fridays each week and enjoy the social aspect of the club too. In order to identify those individuals most likely to benefit from such targeted services, local authorities may undertake screening or case-finding, for instance to identify individuals at risk of developing specific health conditions or experiencing certain events such as strokes, or fallsor those that have needs for care and support which are not currently met by the local authority.

Targeted interventions should also include approaches to identifying carers, including those who are taking on new caring responsibilities. Carers can also benefit from support to help them develop the knowledge and skills to care effectively and look after their own health and wellbeing. Tertiary prevention could include, for example the rehabilitation of people who are severely sight impaired see also chapter 22 sight registers.

This can help develop mechanisms to cope with stress associated with caring and help carers develop an awareness of their own physical and mental health needs. Prevention services are, however, something that should always be considered.

For example, at the end of life in relation to carers, prevention services could include the provision of pre-bereavement support.

Using the Care Act guidance

Intermediate care and reablement 2. The National Audit of Intermediate Care categorises 4 types of intermediate care: Rehabilitation services can include provisions that help people attain independence and remain or return to their home and participate in their community, for example independent living skills and mobility training for people with visual impairment.

This could involve, for instance, reaching beyond traditional health or care interventions to help people develop or regain the skills of independent living and active involvement in their local community. Carers and prevention 2. These interventions may differ from those for people without caring responsibilities.

Examples of services, facilities or resources that could contribute to preventing, delaying or reducing the needs of carers may include but is not limited to those which help carers to: The focus of prevention Promoting wellbeing 2. This is not creating or adding to their caring role but including them in an approach supporting the person to live as independently as possible for as long as possible.

In regard to carers, the local authority should consider how they can be supported to look after their own health and wellbeing and to have a life of their own alongside their caring responsibilities.

For this group of people prevention needs to be considered through other means, such as the provision of community services and activities that would help support people to maintain an independent life.

Case Study An older man lives alone with some support from his daughter who works full-time. He needs occasional personal care to remain living independently with dignity, and it is likely that these needs will increase. An assessment would consider all of his needs, including those currently being met by his daughter, along with the outcomes he wishes to achieve.

Community groups, voluntary organisations, and buddying services could support the father to reduce the social isolation that he may be feeling and maximise opportunities to look after his own health and wellbeing and participate in local community activities. This, in turn could lessen the impact of caring on his daughter and enable her to continue to support her father effectively alongside paid employment.

In this example, the aspects of wellbeing relating to social wellbeing and family relationships might be promoted. Developing resilience and promoting individual strength 2. Local authorities should actively promote participation in providing interventions that are co-produced with individuals, families, friends, carers and the community.A disability is an impairment that may be cognitive, developmental, intellectual, mental, physical, sensory, or some combination of heartoftexashop.com substantially affects a person's life activities and may be present from birth or occur during a person's lifetime.

Disabilities is an umbrella term, covering impairments, activity limitations, and participation restrictions. Updated 28th September General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) The Editorial Board of the London Child Protection Procedures has considered what changes are required to the Procedures to ensure compliance with the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) - implemented through the Data Protection Act Updated 23rd May General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) The Editorial Board of the London Child Protection Procedures has considered what changes are required to the Procedures to ensure compliance with the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR) - implemented through the Data Protection Act Unit Support individuals with multiple conditions and/or disabilities Explain the correlation between conditions and – Disability – Gender – Age – Ethnicity – Socio-economic status There are several theories as to what may cause Alzheimer's disease but here is one thing researchers do know for sure: Women are diagnosed with various forms of dementia, including Alzheimer's, at.

What does special educational needs mean?

Explain the types of support and information carers may require

If a child has a learning difficulty or a disability that makes it harder for them to learn than most children of their age, they may have special educational needs (SEN). Changes to Legislation. Revised legislation carried on this site may not be fully up to date.

Changes and effects are recorded by our editorial team in lists which can be found in the ‘Changes to Legislation’ area.

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